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Microgreen Seed Density Charts

Posted by Nick Greens, Horticulturist/Consultant on 8/1/2018

Microgreens are becoming increasingly popular, allowing growers the opportunity to expand further into existing markets or to venture into new markets.  From farmers markets to local restaurants and chefs, microgreens are perfect for enhancing salads or using as a garnish. By definition, microgreens are tiny plants with only their first leaves developed. Most varieties are harvested at 8-14 days and while they may be smaller and more delicate, they are also more robust and flavorful.

Jake Emling Joins the CropKing Team

Posted by Cropking on 7/30/2018

CropKing Inc., based out of Lodi, OH is pleased to announce that Jake Emling has joined the team in the role of Horticulturist.

Jake grew up in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, where his love of the outdoors and nature started. To pursue this passion, he attended Michigan State University and received both a Bachelors and Masters of Science in Horticulture. While at MSU, Jake conducted research on various fruit crops in intensive growing systems. Additionally, he has experience working in the fertilizer industry, and with grower education, entomology and greenhouses.

Nick Greens Joins the CropKing Inc. Team

Posted by Cropking on 7/24/2018

CropKing Inc., based out of Lodi, OH is pleased to announce the addition of Nick Greens to the CropKing team, in the role of horticulturist/consultant.

Nick Greens started his growing career in 2002 as an apprentice grower for a hydroponics shop. Nick worked through several cycles/harvests in San Diego before venturing out on his own. In 2007, Nick moved to Humboldt County, California to work as an assistant grower for a collective of green houses, where he began experimenting with a vortex brewer to develop several recipes for compost teas. 

Part 1: Rapid Relative Humidity Increases in the Greenhouse

Posted by Cropking on 5/24/2018

When the relative humidity in the greenhouse environment either increases or decreases rapidly, the adaptation capabilities of the plants growing in the greenhouse environment may be challenged beyond the breaking point.

It’s the rate of change in the relative humidity rather than just the difference between the old relative humidity and the new relative humidity levels that can challenge the plant’s ability to adapt without resorting to sacrificing some of its tissue.

Adjusting for seasonal changes

Posted by Cropking on 3/29/2018

When the seasons change, so do growers’ environmental concerns. Even in the greenhouse, where some growers can control their surroundings, changes in the weather can greatly impact the growing process.

Changing light levels

According to Matthew Kispert, horticulturist at CropKing, growers should be cognizant of higher light levels at different points in the year. He recommends looking first at irrigation. Higher light levels can lead to some nutritional issues that proper irrigation methods can help prevent.

5 Reasons to Invest in a Greenhouse

Posted by Cropking on 1/9/2018

Health conscious eaters have spurred a revitalized interest in where and how food is grown. Customers want to know more about controlled environment agriculture (CEA) and how it works. There is no better time to invest in a greenhouse and here are some of the reasons why.

Greenhouse Cleaning & Sanitizing

Posted by Cropking on 12/14/2017

The 2017 growing season here in Lodi is now a wrap, but that doesn’t mean the work is finished. The time between crops can prove to be paramount to the success of the following season. Every grower should take the opportunity afforded by an empty house to perform yearly maintenance tasks, update equipment as needed, and clean and sanitize the greenhouse. 

CropKing Workshop Program Expansion

Posted by Cropking on 11/20/2017

Having found success offering two-day, monthly workshops through its Grower’s School, Lodi, Ohio-based CropKing expanded the program with a Five Day Intensive Workshop.

Is Organic Labelling Something the Hydroponic Industry Needs?

Posted by Cropking on 11/9/2017

In an extremely close vote Nov. 1, the USDA’s National Organic Standards Board made a decision on a controversial issue: can hydroponically grown crops be certified organic? The answer, by an 8-7 margin, was yes. With the vote out of the way, the NOSB will now have to make recommendations on how the hydroponic industry can be governed under the organic label. However, as both organic and hydroponic agriculture adjust to the board’s decision, a simple question looms in the air, “Is organic the best path forward for hydroponically grown crops?”

Q&A: Supplemental lighting

Posted by Cropking on 11/1/2017

Many produce growers view greenhouse structures and hydroponic growing methods as improvements upon the volatile elements of working outdoors in soil. These structures and systems provide growers with the ability to control environmental factors and produce consistent yields year-round.

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